America’s growing Latino population is changing our nation’s demographics, politics, economy, culture, and future.  Pew seeks to improve public understanding of the diverse Hispanic population in the United States and to chronicle the impact Latinos are having on the United States.

This includes public opinion surveys that aim to illuminate Latino views on a range of social matters and public policy issues, including an annual National Survey of Latinos. This work also encompasses demographic studies and other social science research on a wide range of topics, including economics, personal finance, health care, immigration trends, voting patterns, technology, and employment.

Recent Work

February 26, 2020 Acknowledgments

This report was written by Abby Budiman, Research Analyst, Luis Noe-Bustamante, Research Assistant and Mark Hugo Lopez, Director of Global Migration and Demography Research. Editorial guidance was provided by Neil G. Ruiz, Associate Director of Global Migration and Demography Research; Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer; Jens Manuel Krogstad, Senior Writer and Editor; James Bell, Vice […]

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February 26, 2020 Methodology

In this report, we analyzed the detailed demographics and geographic distribution of immigrants who are eligible to vote in the 2020 presidential election. The term “eligible voters” refer to persons ages 18 and older who are U.S. citizens. This report’s analysis is based on Pew Research Center tabulations and projections derived from the following U.S. […]

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February 26, 2020 2. The nation’s most populous states are home to most immigrant voters

The four states with the largest eligible voter populations – California, New York, Florida and Texas – are also home to most immigrant eligible voters. Together, these states hold over half (56%) of the nation’s immigrant voters. California has the largest immigrant eligible voter population by a large margin. In addition, immigrants make up 21% […]

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February 26, 2020 1. U.S. immigrants are rising in number, but just half are eligible to vote

Not all immigrants are U.S. citizens, and as a result, not all immigrants are eligible to vote in federal elections.4 Between 2000 and 2018, over 10 million adult immigrants have gained citizenship and become eligible to vote, raising the share of the foreign-born population that can vote to about half in 2018. In 2000, just […]

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February 26, 2020 Naturalized Citizens Make Up Record One-in-Ten U.S. Eligible Voters in 2020

Since 2000, the size of the immigrant electorate has nearly doubled. More than 23 million U.S. immigrants will be eligible to vote in the 2020 presidential election.

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June 12, 2019 Unauthorized immigrant population trends for states, birth countries and regions

In 2017, an estimated 10.5 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the United States, down from a peak of 12.2 million in 2007. Explore trends in the unauthorized immigrant population for U.S. states, as well as for birth countries and regions.

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June 12, 2019 Video: Is the number of unauthorized immigrants living in the U.S. declining?

The latest Pew Research Center data estimates there were 10.5 million unauthorized immigrants living in the U.S. in 2017, down significantly from a decade prior. In this video, our researchers go behind the scenes to explain the “how” and “why” behind determining these new numbers.

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