flooded treelined street
Project

Flood-Prepared Communities

Floods and hurricanes can threaten human lives and cause significant economic and physical damage to communities, including homes, businesses, and infrastructure. Since 2000, flood-related disasters in the U.S. accounted for more than $845 billion in losses, making it the costliest disaster threat in the nation.

Pew aims to reduce these impacts through policies that will modernize federal flood insurance, mitigate disasters, prioritize investments in flood-ready infrastructure, and promote nature-based solutions.

overview
overview
Article

Mitigation Matters: Policy Solutions to Reduce Local Flood Risk

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Article

Since 2000, floods have cost the United States more than $845 billion in damage to homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure. The expense of adapting to more frequent and severe storms is projected to rise over the next several decades, placing a premium on the need to take action now to reduce the impacts of future floods.

Floods
Floods
Article

Overwhelming Majority of Americans Support Spending More for Flood-Ready Infrastructure

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Overwhelming Majority of Americans Support Spending More for Flood-Ready Infrastructure

As Congress considers devoting hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars toward upgrading the nation’s roads, schools, hospitals, and other infrastructure, an overwhelming majority of Americans—85 percent—endorse requiring that federally funded structures in flood-prone areas be designed to better withstand flooding.

Flooding in Reston VA
Flooding in Reston VA
Article

Virginia Should Fund Flood Preparedness Program, Voters Say

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Flooding in Virginia is becoming more common and costly, and a new poll has found that 84 percent of registered voters in the state—across party lines—favor a state-run fund to help owners of homes and businesses invest in measures to reduce flood risk in their communities.

Our Work

It's Time to Make U.S. Infrastructure Flood-Ready 
Former Charleston Mayor Joseph Riley
After the Storm: Charleston’s Blueprint for Risk Reduction After Hurricane Hugo